Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th World Congress on Green Chemistry and Technology Amsterdam, Netherlands | Hyatt Place Amsterdam Airport | Rijnlanderweg 800, 2132 NN Hoofddorp .

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Paul O’Connor

ANTECY – Fruitful Innovations, Netherlands

Keynote: CREATING THE RIGHT (GREEN) CHEMISTRY CO2, Water and Biomaterials

Time : 10:00-10:40

Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Paul O’Connor photo
Biography:

Paul O’ Connor graduated at the Eindhoven University of Technology in Chemical Engineering in 1977. He has been active in heavy oil conversion processes at Shell and at Akzo Nobel in development of refining catalysts. In 2006 he formed BIOeCON, focused on the economical conversion of biomass. BIOeCON has developed several breakthrough concepts, most recently a process towards selective biomass fractionation producing high value materials. In 2010 Paul formed ANTECY aiming to convert renewable energy directly into high-density liquids. ANTECY has developed technology for the capturing of CO2 based on a low cost and environmentally friendly non-amine sorbents.

 

Abstract:

In the billion year history of our earth a most amazing and unique process has occured of the massive conversion of the plentitude of the present CO2 in the atmosphere with water into biomass or biomaterials under the influence of solar energy, a process we call: photosynthesis.

Because of this processs the CO2 in the earth’s atmosphere dropped from 20% to ± 250 to 300ppm. Part of these biomaterials over billions of years has been degraded (or “fossilized”) and converted into coal, oil and gas, or what we call today fossil fuels.

The accelerated use of these fossil resources over the last 200 years has lead to a sharp increase in CO2, now already at 400 ppm and also the increase of Methane (CH4) in the atmosphere, triggering global warming.

It is our responsibility to invent, develop and apply the right green chemistry making use of the available natural resources such as CO2, water and biomaterials in a way which does not harm the eco-systems of our earth, meaning in a circular and sustainable way,

Examples will be given of innovations in this exciting field over the last 15 years, leading to new technologies, opening up the possibilities for:

  1. Advanced materials and chemicals from biomass and biomass waste
  2. Fuels and chemicals from CO2 and water from the open Air, making use of clean renewable energy (Solar, Wind, Hydropower etc).

 

Keynote Forum

Magrini Kimberly,

National Renewable Energy Laboratory, USA

Keynote: Upgrading Biomass Pyrolysis Vapors to Hydrocarbon Fuels and Chemicals
Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Magrini Kimberly, photo
Biography:

Dr. Magrini is a Principal Scientist in the National Bioenergy Center and currently manages NREL’s Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering Group, which focuses on the development of catalytic approaches to biofuels production from syngas and pyrolysis products from biomass.   She has 29 years of research and management experience in academic, industrial and national laboratory environments and has over 100 peers- reviewed publications, 2 patent applications, 1 patent and 125 presentations at national and international meetings. 

Abstract:

NREL’s thermochemical biomass conversion research is focused on ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis also called vapor phase upgrading (VPU) as a potentially efficient and economical route to pyrolysis-based fuel precursors, fuels and chemicals.  In this approach, biomass vapors are generated via fast pyrolysis (FP) and destabilizing vapor components (char, inorganics, tar aerosols) are removed by hot gas filtration with the conditioned vapors more amenable to catalytic upgrading via emerging and industrially available zeolites. We use a Davison circulating riser (DCR), a petroleum industry standard, for vapor phase upgrading while a close coupled pyrolyzer system produces consistent pyrolysis vapors as feed to the DCR. Concurrent upgrading catalyst development is focused on identifying and evaluating modifications to ZSM5-based catalysts that increase carbon content of the condensed product while also reducing catalyst coking and increasing deoxygenation activity.  Subsequent catalyst screening for vapor upgrading showed marked differences in product composition with catalyst type while similar liquid product was obtained with both mixed hardwood and clean pine feedstocks using the same catalyst and process conditions.  Ash, aerosols and char removal were additionally quantified for selected experiments.  The work presented here will show 1) the impact on product composition from pure vapor upgrading with a suite of catalysts comprising unmodified, and P- and metal-modified zeolites, 2) comprehensive physical and chemical product composition, 3) product fuels from hydrotreating, and 4) chemicals from aqueous phase organics.  These results will be discussed and compared with other work conducted in riser systems to produce biomass derived hydrocarbon fuels.

Keynote Forum

Anet Režek Jambrak

University of Zagreb, Croatia

Keynote: "Greener" food processing in light of sustainability

Time : 10:40-11:20

Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Anet Režek Jambrak photo
Biography:

ANET REŽEK JAMBRAK, Associate professor is working at the Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology of the University of Zagreb, Croatia. She is working in the area of nonthermal and advanced thermal processing techniques, food chemistry, food physics, and process engineering. She also has strong international collaboration with renowned scientists. In the period from 2007. Anet Režek Jambrak has published over 80 significant scientific papers, published in top scientific journals with high impact factors (citation more than 1300, h-index 20). She is the winner of the 2016. Young Scientist Award from the International Union of Food Science and Technology. 

Abstract:

Non-thermal and innovative processing technologies are attracting great attention nowadays. The advantages of those “green” technologies lies in faster, better, cheaper, sustainable and optimised process for preservation of foods, modification of food components or to design “novel food”.

Application of thermal techniques is used for decades and non-thermal techniques are being “considered” in terms of food preservation. Non-thermal processing techniques include: electrotechnologies, UV light, cold pressure (high pressure processing), hydrodynamic cavitation, ionising radiation, ozonation, oscillating magnetic fields, pulsed light, supercritical fluid processing, biopreservation, electrohydrodynamic processing and electron beam processing.

Sustainability of non-thermal processing is now "hot" topic. Valorisation of agri-food wastes by non-thermal technologies is great research area nowadays. There is large discard of food by-products in food industry that can be used as energy or raw-material for other purposes. In order to think “green”, eco (economic, ecologic and environmental) we must think about having non-thermal processing in the way of less processing time, less energy consumption, less CO2 production and energy efficient processing (sustainability). Food scientists need to think to connect all processing variables and to have "green" strategy. There are methods of life cycle assessment (LCA); Quality function deployment etc. that can combine parameters and give results about improvement of processing, consumer’s preferences and impact on the environment. The use of "green" solvents is one example in sustainable extraction.

Non-thermal and innovative food processing can and must be optimised, and results should be transformed from lab scale to large scale (industry).

  • Industrial Applications of Green Chemistry | Environmental Chemistry and Pollution Control | Green Chemistry and Technology | Biomass and its Conversion | Life Cycle Assessment and Environmental Sustainability
Speaker

Chair

Paul O Connor

ANTECY, Netherlands

Co-Chair

Rudina Bleta

University of Artois, France

Session Introduction

Paul O’Connor

ANTECY – Fruitful Innovations, Netherlands

Title: CREATING THE RIGHT (GREEN) CHEMISTRY CO2, Water and Biomaterials
Speaker
Biography:

Paul O’ Connor graduated at the Eindhoven University of Technology in Chemical Engineering in 1977. He has been active in heavy oil conversion processes at Shell and at Akzo Nobel in development of refining catalysts. In 2006 he formed BIOeCON, focused on the economical conversion of biomass. BIOeCON has developed several breakthrough concepts, most recently a process towards selective biomass fractionation producing high value materials. In 2010 Paul formed ANTECY aiming to convert renewable energy directly into high-density liquids. ANTECY has developed technology for the capturing of CO2 based on a low cost and environmentally friendly non-amine sorbents.

 

Abstract:

In the billion year history of our earth a most amazing and unique process has occured of the massive conversion of the plentitude of the present CO2 in the atmosphere with water into biomass or biomaterials under the influence of solar energy, a process we call: photosynthesis.

Because of this processs the CO2 in the earth’s atmosphere dropped from 20% to ± 250 to 300ppm. Part of these biomaterials over billions of years has been degraded (or “fossilized”) and converted into coal, oil and gas, or what we call today fossil fuels.

The accelerated use of these fossil resources over the last 200 years has lead to a sharp increase in CO2, now already at 400 ppm and also the increase of Methane (CH4) in the atmosphere, triggering global warming.

It is our responsibility to invent, develop and apply the right green chemistry making use of the available natural resources such as CO2, water and biomaterials in a way which does not harm the eco-systems of our earth, meaning in a circular and sustainable way,

Examples will be given of innovations in this exciting field over the last 15 years, leading to new technologies, opening up the possibilities for:

  1. Advanced materials and chemicals from biomass and biomass waste
  2. Fuels and chemicals from CO2 and water from the open Air, making use of clean renewable energy (Solar, Wind, Hydropower etc).

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Kimberly Magrini is a Principal Scientist in the National Bioenergy Center and currently manages NREL’s Thermochemical Sciences and Engineering Group, which focuses on the development of catalytic approaches to biofuels production from syngas and pyrolysis products from biomass.   She has 29 years of research and management experience in academic, industrial and national laboratory environments and has over 100 peers- reviewed publications, 2 patent applications, 1 patent and 125 presentations at national and international meetings.  

Abstract:

NREL’s thermochemical biomass conversion research is focused on ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis also called vapor phase upgrading (VPU) as a potentially efficient and economical route to pyrolysis-based fuel precursors, fuels and chemicals.  In this approach, biomass vapors are generated via fast pyrolysis (FP) and destabilizing vapor components (char, inorganics, tar aerosols) are removed by hot gas filtration with the conditioned vapors more amenable to catalytic upgrading via emerging and industrially available zeolites. We use a Davison circulating riser (DCR), a petroleum industry standard, for vapor phase upgrading while a close coupled pyrolyzer system produces consistent pyrolysis vapors as feed to the DCR. Concurrent upgrading catalyst development is focused on identifying and evaluating modifications to ZSM5-based catalysts that increase carbon content of the condensed product while also reducing catalyst coking and increasing deoxygenation activity.  Subsequent catalyst screening for vapor upgrading showed marked differences in product composition with catalyst type while similar liquid product was obtained with both mixed hardwood and clean pine feedstocks using the same catalyst and process conditions.  Ash, aerosols and char removal were additionally quantified for selected experiments.  The work presented here will show 1) the impact on product composition from pure vapor upgrading with a suite of catalysts comprising unmodified, and P- and metal-modified zeolites, 2) comprehensive physical and chemical product composition, 3) product fuels from hydrotreating, and 4) chemicals from aqueous phase organics.  These results will be discussed and compared with other work conducted in riser systems to produce biomass derived hydrocarbon fuels.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Dimitris Argyropoulos, Professor of Chemistry at North Carolina State University, is internationally recognized for his leading contributions to Green Chemistry using wood biopolymers. His work focuses at promoting our understanding of the structure and reactivity of lignin and the development novel NMR and material science techniques for the structural elucidation and the upgrading of these biopolymers representing otherwise unsolved, intractable problems in lignin based material’s chemistry. The efforts of his research group have been disseminated in excess of 200 scientific papers, numerous scientific conferences and invited presentations. 

Abstract:

Carbon fibers represent a class of materials with enormous potential for many material and other engineering applications for our society. There are projections that by 2020 the actual demand for carbon fibers will be such that the traditional poly-acrylonotrile precursors used today will not be enough to address the projected demand. Consequently, it is imperative that new precursors based on the foundations of Green Chemistry need be developed. In this respect technical lignins present us with formidable challenges but also with enormous opportunities and they are to  be explored in detail during this presentation.   In our earlier effort we have embarked in describing and discussing the importance of propargylation chemistry on lignin so as to synthesize lignin macromonomers for thermal polymerization via Claisen rearrangement 1, 2. We have also discussed that the molecular weight and glass transition temperatures of the thermally polymerized lignin improves significantly relative to the starting material. The intricate polymer structure created within lignin as a result of the benzopyran double bond thermal polymerization chemistry is offering a regular covalently linked framework from which, after carbonization, a regular carbon fiber material could. As such, thermally polymerized propargylated softwood lignin emerges as a prospective material for the synthesis of bio-based Carbon Fiber precursor. Various reactivity considerations that are to be discussed in the presentation 3 were addressed by a series of experiments where initially Acetone Soluble Kraft Lignin (ASKL) was propargylated, thus occupying all readily accessible and highly reactive phenolic–OHs, followed by methylation of the remaining phenolic OH’s to limit phenoxy radical induced thermal polymerization. All the polymerization reactions were conducted by heating the samples at 180 °C for three hours and the corresponding molecular weights and distributions were determined.

As anticipated, the installation of the propargyl groups in more reactive positions, more readily prone to Claisen rearrangement and thermal polymerization events, offered much better developed molecular weights able to offer Carbon Fibers.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Claudia Crestini is associate professor at the University of Rome Tor Vergata. Director of the Laboratory of Polyphenols Chemistry & Materials Science, her work is internationnally recognized as a leading contribution to Green Chemistry using natural polyphenols. It is focused on the development of new methods of structural analysis of polyphenolic polymers, development of new materials and products by chemical/biotechnological modification and development of innovative stimuli responsive nanomaterials from natural polyphenols. She has published more than 140 publications on international refereed journals and over 150 contributions to international conferences and invited presentations. H-index 41, citations > 5000 (source google scholar).

 

 

Abstract:

Tannins are natural polyphenols found in most higher plants around the globe. They play a significant role in defending the plant against insects, infections, fungi or bacteria; this role stems from their capability to form complexes with proteins, polysaccharides and metals, and hence provide protection to the vulnerable parts of the plants against invasive microbial extracellular enzymes. However, their exploitation as renewable high added value products is to date not extensive despite their interesting intrinsic properties, including high biocompatibility and biodegradability. The fundamental positive health effects of tannins, which are connected to their high antioxidant activity and their role as radical scavengers, allow for protection from diseases associate with the presence of free radicals in the body, such as cancer, arthritis, and degenerative eye and neurological disorders, and display significant potential for biofilm control undoubtedly revealing intriguing potential for their application in biomedical fields that is yet to be explored. In this frame our research group, aiming at designing a rational process for tannins valorization developed an innovative 31P NMR analytical technique for fast and reliable quantification of all the different phenolic groups present in complex tannns matrices and applied it to the selective functionalization of tannins of different origins and structures in order to tune biological and chemico physical properties such as hydrophobicity and chelation. Furthermore, the high tendency to supramolecular interactions was succesfully exploited for the design and development of nanostructures for synergistic controlled drug delivery by ultrasonication.

Speaker
Biography:

Thorsten Brandau completed his PhD at Goethe University. He is president at BRACE GmbH, Germany.

 

Abstract:

In Green Chemistry processes, there is a need for administering actives in well defined forms as well as using processes and materials in a recoverable and sustainable manner. For these needs, it is mandatory to discuss shape, size and form of dosage, carriers and recovery methods.

Microspheres and Microcapsules manufactured with the BRACE Microsphere processes offer the unique possibility to combine encapsulation with low energy production process as well as recovering of carriers with resource saving means.

The monomodal size and extremely tight size distribution of the particles produced with such processes, allow the precise dosage or the handling of catalysts in a most advantageous manner. Particles produced with the patented BRACE-microsphere processes can be used for producing catalysts and catalyst carriers in a size range from about 50 micrometers up to 8 mm, or the encapsulation of an extremely wide range of materials for release on definable triggers – such as mechanical force, temperature, pH, solubility, and many others. The processes can be used to reform materials from sub-zero to 1500°C, while most materials can be easily processed at room temperature to form perfectly round spheres. Such spheres show extremely well definable release properties and can be tailored to almost any application. Applications so far realized range from catalysts and catalyst carriers – easily recoverable and reusable –, over bioreactors, cell encapsulation for biochemical processes, agricultural applications – such as reducing the pesticide and fertilizer needs –, to energy processing for sustainable construction materials, recovering oil and gas, solar cells, energy storage and many more applications.

In the field of alternative fuel production or the thermal conversion of biomass, there are several applications already that make use of those properties. As the scalability of the processes is easy, straight forward and unlimited, also large and very large scale productions can easily be covered, at both, a low energy and resource use that scales less than the production output.

Speaker
Biography:

Rudina Bleta has completed her PhD from Nancy University and postdoctoral studies from University Paul Sabatier at the CIRIMAT-Carnot Institute in Toulouse. In 2012, she joined the Professor Monflier’s team at the UCCS-Artois as a lecturer. Her research expertise consists in developing new synthesis approaches, especially from soft chemistry routes, to design novel nanostructured porous materials, with a specific focus on the development of heterogeneous catalysts for environmental and sustainable energy applications.

 

Abstract:

The development of sustainable chemical processes is becoming a major feature of research for the protection of human health and the environment. In this context, the heterogeneous photocatalysis, using semiconductor-liquid interfaces as catalytic sites for solar light-stimulated redox reactions, has emerged as a promising technology for environmental clean-up applications. Among the various metal oxide semiconductors, titanium dioxide (TiO2) has become one of the most important photocatalysts because of its chemical stability and unique ability in catalyzing water splitting, air purification and water decontamination. For effective solar energy utilization, modification of TiO2 surface with noble metal nanoparticles provides an alternative approach for extending the absorption wavelength from the ultraviolet (UV) to the visible region. In this context, Au/TiO2 composites have attracted much interest as efficient plasmonic photocatalysts owing to the ability of Au nanoparticles to absorb light in the visible region and TiO2 to efficiently separate the photogenerated electrons and holes at the metal-semiconductor interface.

In this work, we describe a simple colloidal self-assembly approach towards highly active UV- and visible-light photocatalysts that takes advantage of the ability of cyclodextrins to direct the self-assembly of TiO2 colloids in a porous network over which Au nanoparticles can be uniformly dispersed. The performance of these nanocomposites is evaluated in the visible light photocatalytic degradation of the phenoxyacetic acid (PAA), a widely utilized herbicide, frequently detected in natural water. The CD-driven approach is simple and provides a versatile route towards a broad range of nanostructured composites with promising properties for environmental clean-up applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Elze is an Advisor at The Natural Step Germany, and Associate Partner at the Sustainable Growth Associates network. Elze holds an MBA in Sustainable Management and an MA degree in Organisational Sociology, combining different perspectives within an organisation, such as policy, strategy, change, culture, cooperation, behaviour and communication. Elze is passionate about the strategic implementation of sustainability using The Natural Step framework, and she’s convinced that innovations in chemistry and materials management are key to accelerating the transition to sustainability.

 

Abstract:

Too often we cherry-pick sustainability topics: there is a focus on green chemistry, climate change, on circular economy, or types of poverty. Rarely do we look at the many faceted challenges of sustainability as deeply interconnected, The root causes of these challenges lie in the fundamental unsustainability of the way we organize our businesses and societies.

Based on the laws of thermodynamics and sociological research on the healthy functioning of socio-ecological systems, the Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development (FSSD) identifies four root causes of unsustainability. Together, they constitute the boundary conditions or design principles for humanities to sustain within the limits of planet earth. In this way, the conditions constitute a science-based definition of success for sustainable design, selection and management of chemicals, materials and products.

The Strategic Life Cycle Assessment (SLCA) applies the sustainability principles in each phase of the product life cycle – creating a ‘heat map’, merging perspectives on chemicals, circular economy and SDGs, and providing direction for effective sustainability innovation.  By applying these sustainability principles rigorously and strategically, the systems perspective that underlies it assures holistic and integrated solutions, avoiding solutions that only combat symptoms, or solutions that cause complications in other domains.

The Natural Step has been helping organisations apply these principles since the early 1990’s. Here we focus on application and insights around circular / sustainable product innovation.

Speaker
Biography:

Chungsik Yoon has completed his PhD from Seoul National Universty in 1999 and got Certified Industrial Hygienist (CIH) from the American Board of Industrial Hygiene in 2001. He is the professor of School of Public Health, Seoul National Universty and the associate president of Korean Industrial Hygiene Association. He has published more than 150 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of the Safet and Health at Work journal.

 

Abstract:

The semiconductor industry is considered the most high technology based industry and is characterized by complicated processes as well as massive chemical use. This study aimed to know the overall status of the chemical use, trade secrects and to evaluate the high risk CMR(carcinogens, mutagens and reproductive toxic) chemicals used in semiconductor manufacturing industries. On behalf of OSHRI (Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute) Project in Korea, we collected data about Serial no. chemical product name, chemical constituents (chemical name, CAS No.) and trade secrets, contents of each product, the physical status of chemical, amount of annual use, manufacturer and vendor of the chemical products, chemical use process from twelve workplaces. On average, 210±124 chemical products were used in semiconductor industry and 33±16% of proucts contained at least one trade sectrets. Numerous CMR substances were found including sulfuric acid, chromic acid, Ethylene oxide, hydroquinone and 2-Ethoxyethanol.  More than 60% of chemical substane used in semiconductor industy has no NEFA index on health, safety and reactivity. Chemical product supplier was diverse. Average number of chemical product manufacturer was 62±21 per semiconductor plant and the number of chemical products supplied by each manufacturer was from 1 to 41 product.

High propotion of trade secrets,  numerous numbers of CMR,  high percentage of no health and safety information on the  chemical proucts waits on proactive challenge and study for green chemistry and sustainabilty in semiconductor industry.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Yaxin Su received his Ph D of Power Engineering and Thermophysics with a focus on combustion from Zhejiang University, China, in 2000. He worked in the Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Mississippi, USA as a visiting professor during 2006-2007. He is currently a professor in the School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Donghua University, China.

 

Abstract:

Iron based catalysts supported on Aluminum Pillared Montmorillonite (Fe-Al-PILC) were prepared. The methods including XRD, H2-TPR, Py-FTIR, Uv-Vis spectroscopy, ICP, N2 adsorption-desorption, etc were used to characterize the basic physical and chemical properties of the catalysts. The characteristics of selective catalytic reduction of NO by propylene on the catalyst surface were studied experimentally in a fixed-bed reactor, and the effect of the Al3+/clay ratios on the physicochemical properties of the catalyst and the SCR-C3H6 was investigated. The results show that 9Fe/Al-PILC has higher SCR-C3H6 denitrification performance, e.g., 100% of NO conversion to N2 was tested over 400 °C. The Al3+/clay ratio plays more important role on NO conversion than the calcination temperature of the carrier. According to the Al3+/clay ratios, the order of catalytic activity is 9Fe/Al-PILC-10 > 9Fe/Al-PILC-20 > 9Fe/Al-PILC-5 > 9Fe/clay > 9Fe/Al-PILC-40. Al3+ increased the specific surface area of the montmorillonite dramatically, and the catalyst had micropores and mesoporous structures. When the Al3+/clay ratio was 10 mmol/g, the pillared montmorillonite had the best physicochemical property. In the Fe/Al-PILC catalysts, the iron oxides are highly dispersed on the surface of the support. H2-TPR shows that the reduction of Fe2O3 phase determines the SCR activity of the catalyst. With the increase of Al3+/clay ratio, the reducing temperature of the reducing process Fe3O4→Fe gradually increases. UV-vis results showed that Al3+ increased the oligomer FexOy, and the activity of the catalyst was positively correlated with the oligomer FexOy. Py-IR results showed that both Lewis acid and Bronsted acid were favorable for the selective catalytic reduction of NO. The 9Fe/Al-PILC-10 catalyst had the best activity, which was related to its higher Brønsted acid content.

 

Bharti Khungar

Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS) Pilani, India

Title: Design and Use of an Imidazolium Ion-tagged Fluorescent Chemosensor for Sensing Metal ions in Water

Time : 15:10-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Bharti Khungar is an Associate Professor and Head, Department of Chemistry, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, India. She carried out her doctoral research in Chemistry at University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India and obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2002. She is working in the field green chemistry for synthesis, characterization and applications ion-tagged moieties. These ion-tagged molecules have been screened for biological applications, and catalytic properties on complexation with metal ions. Recently she is working for designing water soluble sensing material for detection of toxic metal ions in water.

 

Abstract:

In present scenario for the accurate detection of a contaminant in unprocessed environmental samples there is need to develop innovative chemosensors which provides excellent selectivity and sensitivity to heavy and transition metal ions. A major challenge of developing chemo sensors is the design of chelators possessing both high affinity and high selectivity. Most of the metal ions are carcinogens and lead to serious health concerns, hence, fast and accurate detection of metal ions has become a critical issue1. We have developed a simple fluorescent chemosensor containing only imidazolium ionic tag along with Schiff base for the detection of metal ion contamination in water. Ionic tags are entirely composed of ions, are drawing extensive interest, since they can be tailored to satisfy the functional requirements for building organic materials by changing either the cation or anion species 2. Ionic tags have achieved great success in acting as luminescent materials, exhibit strong fluorescence with high quantum yields 3. Schiff bases also are readily obtained by simple synthetic procedures and usually exhibit strong emission upon binding to specific foreign ions4.  For this work 8-aminoquinoline is used as an amine source, which is a traditional fluorophore which is widely employed in the design of sensors due to its coordination function. Details of synthesis, characterization and sensing studies will be shown in presentation during the conference.

Vandana Khungar

University of Rajasthan, India

Title: Laws to Enhance Green Chemistry and Protect Humanity

Time : 16:00-16:30

Speaker
Biography:

Vandana Khungar has completed her PhD in 2011 from the University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India. Presently she is a Post Doctoral fellow from Indian Council of Social Science Research, New Delhi, India. She is working in the area of Indian constitution and laws.

 

Abstract:

With the development, human beings have created a background of destruction that necessitates incorporation of green chemistry in daily life. Adoption of this revolutionary and diverse discipline have led to significant environmental benefits, innovation and a strengthened economy. Laws have contributed significantly to enhance the concept of Green Chemistry in the United States. Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 governs the majority of industrial chemicals, Pollution Prevention Act 1990 has helped foster new approaches for dealing with pollution by preventing environmental problems before they happen. In 2008, the State of California approved two laws aiming to encourage green chemistry, launching the California Green Chemistry Initiative. One of these statutes required California's Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC) to develop new regulations to prioritize "chemicals of concern" and promote the substitution of hazardous chemicals with safer alternatives.

Such laws should also be implemented in India to combat accidents like Bhopal gas tragedy. Due to the leak of gas in the world's worst industrial disaster in1984 at the Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant, 500,000 people were killed due to methyl isocyanate and other gases. This was an incident of the past but a good example of how mankind is still struggling with the use of pesticides in the present is Cancer Train. The train commences from Abohar and leaves from the Bathinda station to reach Rajasthan's Bikaner, where patients undergo treatment at the Acharya Tulsi Regional Cancer Treatment and Research Centre (RCC). In Malwa (Punjab) farmers use 15 different pesticide sprays and the unregulated and excessive use of chemical fertilizers and pesticides have resulted in farmers and their families living in a cesspool of toxicity. Presently rise in cancer deaths (18/day) in Punjab can be attributed to indiscriminate use of agro-chemicals after the Green Revolution.

When developed nations like America can grow in the realm of green chemistry, then why not a developing nation like India?

When developed nations like America can grow in the realm of green chemistry, then why not a developing nation like India? The present study deals with recommendation of drafting and implementation of such laws in India and rest of the world, the details will be presented in the conference.

 

Jun ZHANG

Chinese Academy of Sciences, China

Title: High Value-added Cellulose Products Prepared from Low-grade Cellulose Resources

Time : 16:30-17:00

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Jun Zhang is a full professor of polymer science and materials at CAS Key Laboratory of Engineering Plastics, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ICCAS). He obtained his Ph.D. degree at Dalian University of Technology of China in 1999. He has published more than 150 research articles and three book chapters, and holds 28 china patents. His research interests include processing and functionalization of natural polymers, physics and chemistry of cellulose, ionic liquids and their applications in polymer materials, and high performance polymers and polymer composites.
 

 

Abstract:

Cellulose is the most abundant renewable organic material with a host of current and potential uses. Starting with dissolving pulp as a purified raw material, cellulose is converted industrially into regenerated materials (fibers, films, food casings, membranes, sponges, etc.) and cellulose derivatives (ethers and esters). However, until now, the main resource for commercial cellulose production are concentrating on the highly pure cellulose resources such as cotton linters and dissolving wood pulp. This fact makes the cellulose resource expensive to obtain. In contrast, the low-grade lignocellulosic biomass has become attractive as a renewable resource because it is available in large quantities and routinely widely cultivated in the world. At present, development of new and effective methods to convert low-grade cellulose into high value-added products is critical. With this aim, we developed two strategies: 1) all-cellulose nanocomposites reinforced with in-situ retained cellulose nanocrystals during selective dissolution of cellulose in an IL, and 2) blending low degree of polymerization (DP) cellulose with a small amount of high-DP cellulose.  With these two strategies, some low-grade cellulose resources, such as agricultural straw, waste newspapers, and waste cellulose-containing fabrics, were converted into high value-added cellulose-based films. In this talk, I would like introduce our research progress in this field.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Chen Wang is an associate professor of Environmental Engineering at North University of China, Taiyuan. He studied Chemical Engineering at Tianjin University and received his phD in this area from school of Chemical Engineering and Technology under the guidance of Dr. Wulin Wang, in 2017. After one year of postdoctoral research at Tianjin University with Prof. Meiqing Shen, he joined the department of Environment at North University of China. His research interests lie in the field of heterogeneous catalysis, mainly on the reliability research on Cu/CHA.

 

 

Abstract:

Part 1:

The deactivation mechanism of Cu/CHA ammonia selective catalytic reduction catalysts by SO3 poisoning has been systematically investigated using a range of analytical techniques. In order to study the influence of SO3 poisoning on active Cu2+ ions and the zeolite framework, different sulfate samples were prepared with different contents of SO3 (0 ~ 20%) in SOx under same poisoning condition. The results reveal the NO conversion of samples poisoned by SO3 decreased more than that poisoned by SO2 when temperature ranged between 100 oC and 600 oC. The TPR and EPR results demonstrate that SO3 poisoning does a significant influence on the amount of active Cu2+ ions than SO2 does. The kinetic results illustrate the SO3 poisoning has no impact on the apparent activation energy (Ea) of NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/CHA catalysts. The reason of NH3-SCR activity declining is the reduction of the number of isolated Cu2+ ions among the kinetic temperature regions. The ex-situ DRIFTs and BET results expose that the SO3 poisoning could decrease the crystallization by damaging Si-OH-Al structure. The NH3-SCR activity at high temperature decline because of the NH3 migration difficulty resulted by structure damaging.

Part 2:

Cu/CHA catalysts have been found to be affected by alkali and alkali earth ions; however, the poisoning mechanism is still unclear. In order to investigate Na poisoning effects and its mechanism on Cu/SAPO-34 and Cu/SSZ-13, five samples with different Na contents were synthesized. The Na effects on the structure, Cu species, and NH3-SCR reaction over Cu/CHA were characterized through XRD, BET, NH3-TPD, ex-DRIFTS, H2-TPR, EPR, activity tests and kinetic experiments, and CO2-DRIFTS were used to probe the types of Na species. The results indicate that the introduced Na+ exchanged with H+ and Cu2+, and it mainly substituted H+ from Si-OH-Al, then H+ from surface OH, finally isolated Cu2+. The exchanged H+ led to the structure damaging of Cu/CHA by dealumination, and the exchanged Cu2+ aggregated and formed CuOx species. The NH3-SCR activity decreased with Na contents, and the loss of isolated Cu2+ and CHA structure was responsible for the performance deactivation.

Speaker
Biography:

Ksenija Kumrić has completed her PhD at the Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Serbia. She is employed at the Laboratory of Physics, "Vinča" Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and engaged in the realization of the project "Physics and Chemistry with Ion Beams" financed by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Republic Serbia. Research work is focused in the field of separation chemistry, especially membrane based separation processes and adsorption, and its application in radiochemistry, analytical and environmental chemistry. 

 

Abstract:

Pesticides released from agricultural practices are an important class of pollutants due to their widespread use, toxicity, persistance, polar nature and water solubility. Monitoring of the pesticides comprises a sample preparation step - for separation and enrichment, and high performance techniques for quantifications. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been proved to be an effective sample pretreatment method due to high enrichment efficiency, low consumption of organic solvents, simplicity and easy operation. The choice of appropriate adsorbent is a crucial factor to obtain high recoveries and high enrichment factors in SPE procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using activated carbon (AC) derived from coconut shell as the SPE packing material for the preconcentration of five varying polarity pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, carbendazim, simazine and linuron) from aqueous solutions before determination by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The effects of the solution pH, eluent type, eluent volume and flow rate were investigated for optimization of the presented procedure. The adsorption was achieved quantitatively on AC column at the pH range 2.0 – 8.0, then the retained pesticides content was eluted with dichloromethane. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit was found to be 29.3 - 121.4 ng/L, depending on the pesticide. The obtained results indicated that the proposed method could be used for the simultaneous determination of the varying polarity pesticides in environmental water samples at trace levels.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Ksenija Kumrić has completed her PhD at the Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Serbia. She is employed at the Laboratory of Physics, "Vinča" Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade, Serbia and engaged in the realization of the project "Physics and Chemistry with Ion Beams" financed by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development of Republic Serbia. Research work is focused in the field of separation chemistry, especially membrane based separation processes and adsorption, and its application in radiochemistry, analytical and environmental chemistry. 

 

Abstract:

Pesticides released from agricultural practices are an important class of pollutants due to their widespread use, toxicity, persistance, polar nature and water solubility. Monitoring of the pesticides comprises a sample preparation step - for separation and enrichment, and high performance techniques for quantifications. Solid phase extraction (SPE) has been proved to be an effective sample pretreatment method due to high enrichment efficiency, low consumption of organic solvents, simplicity and easy operation. The choice of appropriate adsorbent is a crucial factor to obtain high recoveries and high enrichment factors in SPE procedure. The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility of using activated carbon (AC) derived from coconut shell as the SPE packing material for the preconcentration of five varying polarity pesticides (imidacloprid, acetamiprid, carbendazim, simazine and linuron) from aqueous solutions before determination by high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD). The effects of the solution pH, eluent type, eluent volume and flow rate were investigated for optimization of the presented procedure. The adsorption was achieved quantitatively on AC column at the pH range 2.0 – 8.0, then the retained pesticides content was eluted with dichloromethane. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit was found to be 29.3 - 121.4 ng/L, depending on the pesticide. The obtained results indicated that the proposed method could be used for the simultaneous determination of the varying polarity pesticides in environmental water samples at trace levels.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Radojka Vujasin has completed her PhD at the Faculty of Physical Chemistry, University of Belgrade, Serbia. She is employed at the Department of Materials Science, "Vinča" Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Serbia. As a researcher she is working in the field of materials science dealing with the synthesis, characterisation and modification of carbon materials and metal hydrides. She has experience in theoretical research using different computer programmes based on density functional theory.

 

Abstract:

Hazardous industrial waste is the most common source of environmental pollution. Waters originating from unregulated landfills and places of inadequate disposal of this type of waste can pollute the sources of drinking water and affect the health of the population. As a starting material for the synthesis of inorganic pigments, galvanic waste sludge from Ni/Cr plating was used. Color of the obtained inorganic pigments vary from green through brown to black, which can be attributed to the existence of Cr and Fe chromophore ions, as dominant components in the composition of sludge. Black inorganic pigment, mixed Fe/Cr oxide (Cr1.3Fe0.7O3), was synthesised by adding Fe2O3 to the sludge and choosing the appropriate temperature of calcination (1000 oC). Values of L*a*b* coordinates were 23.8, 1.6 and 0 were obtained respectively and are in accordance with the literature. XRD, SEM, PSD (particle size distribution) analysis were performed on the as received sludge and synthesized pigment. Black pigments can be considered as “inert”, against the water leaching, which is quite opposite to the leaching stability of the dried sludge.

Speaker
Biography:

Ljiljana Matović is a director of Department of Material Science, "Vinča" Institute of Nuclear Sciences. As a researcher she is working in the field of Material Science, dealing with the synthesis, characterization and modification of different kind of materials ranging from synthetic (carbon, metal hydrides) to natural (clay, zeolites) and their composites. The main field of interest are materials for waste conversion. She has teaching experience (as a mentor) of PhDs and Masters theses as well as management experience (as science project leader) and experience in production and investigation of radiopharmaceuticals.

Abstract:

Dyes and pigments are used by many industries to color their products. Presence of dye molecules, even at very low concentrations, is undesirable and may significantly affect photosynthetic activity in aquatic systems. A new approach that combines the use of carbon material, as an adsorbent matrix, coupled with the high energy irradiation derived from the radioactive waste sources was used for degradation of Methylene blue (MB), which was taken as an example of contaminant. Synergistic effect on the degradation of the dye was investigated. Irradiated solutions of MB with carbon-based material show significantly greater decrease in absorption then the unirradiated solutions using only carbon-based  material or irradiation. Positions of all bands in spectra remain unchanged except a slight shift and changes in the relative intensities of the bands at 1100 cm-1 assigned to C-O stretching in phenolic groups (1000-1250 cm-1). High energy radiation in water medium can produce radiolysis of water i.e. several active species such as H2, H2O2, H+, OH, eaq, •OH and •H. As a result of formed reactive speaces which originate from the irradiated material and radiolysis of water, the amplitude of all absorption bands characteristic for MB disappeared completely. Joint application of those techniques, radiolysis and adsorption, using waste radioactive sources, as well as modified waste materials, has not been applied before.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Rong-Xin Yuan has completed his PhD in 2002 at Nanjing University.During 2002-2004, he worked at University of Bielefeld and University of Nottingham as postdoctoral fellow. Now he is the director of Key Lab of Advanced Functional Materials. He has published more than 80 papers in reputed journals. 

Abstract:

Excessive Fe3+ ions in water will cause great harm to the human body, even if it is required. Therefore, the design of new flurescence probes for Fe3+ ion is very important . Herein, Mg(HPCD) (H2O) (H3PCD=9-(2-(ethoxy(hydroxy)phosphoryl)ethyl)-9H-carbazole-3,6-dicarboxylic acid) was synthesized and characterized. Adjacent {MgO6} octahedra are joined by O-P-O and O-C-O groups into 1D chain, which are linked by the HPCD2- ligands to form a 2D layer parallel then packed to form  a 3D network(Fig.1). The Fe3+ ion can reduce fluorescence relative to other  metal ions (Cd2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Sr2+, Al3+, Zn2+, Mn2+, Pb2+, Fe2+) (Fig.2), so the compound may be used as a fluorescence prob for Fe3+ ion. 

Fig.1 Structure of Mg(HPCD)(H2O) viewed along the b-axis.

Fig.2 Fluorescence intensities of Mg(HPCD)(H2O) immersed in the individual aqueous solutions

 

Speaker
Biography:

Marta Pineiro achieved her Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry in 2003 in the University of Coimbra, Portugal, and since 2002 has been enrolled at the University of Coimbra, being at present Auxiliary Professor. Her research interests are in the area of sustainable synthesis, microwave-assisted organic synthesis and synthesis and biological applications of tetrapyrrolic macrocycles. She has published so far 50 articles in international peer-reviewed journals, 17 meeting proceedings and is the co-author of 6 books and book chapters and 4 patents.

 

 

Abstract:

About 38% of the 407 millions tons of plastics produced worldwide is used in the packaging industry in a market dominated by the polyolefins (PP,LDPE,HDPE).  This means that, only by this activity, 154 millions tons of waste are generated and a huge part of this will be lost from any recycling circuit finishing their brief lives in landfills[1].  The introduction of biodegradable materials in packaging industry will reduce the pressure over the deposition in landfills but the decomposition must be in a way that safe products are generate during the process of environment friendly biodegradation to carbon dioxide [2].The non-edible nature of cellulose, its abundance as available material in the form of wood or agriculture residues and its renewable and biodegradable characteristics makes this natural polymer an interesting material to be used as environmental friendly packaging materials.[3] However, cellulose lacks thermoplasticity which means that it must be blended with other polymeric materials in order to get possible to be workable in packaging industry.  Polyesters are generally biodegradable polymers due to the reversibility of the ester bond by hydrolysis. The manipulation of the structure could turn the mechanical properties of the polyesters more similar to polyolefins and in a future replace them as a main thermoplastic source. Actually polyesters are more expensive than polyolefins but the introduction of low cost fillers could reduce costs and improve mechanical properties [4].

In this work we present the results of the combination of hydrolysed pulp cellulose with Bioflex® which a mixture of two biodegradable polyesters polylactic acid (PLA) and polybutylenesuccinate (PBS). The mechanical behaviour of composite samples with different amounts of cellulose will be discussed.

 

Tofik Nagiev

Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and Inorganic Chemistry, Azerbaijan

Title: Mechanism of Biomimetic Monooxidation of Cyclohexane by Hydrogen Peroxide
Speaker
Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. His main publications are listed below:

  1. M.F.Nagiev and T.M.Nagiev "The Conjugate Dehydrogenation of Hydrocarbons", Book: Advances in Chemistry-133, Editor Hugh M. Hulbert, 1974. pp. 137-147, USA.
  2. Tofik M. Nagiev. Coherent Synchronized Oxidation reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide. Elsevier. Amsterdam. 2007, p.340. Monography
  3. T.M.Nagiev. Chapter. "Physicochemical Peculiarities of Iron Porphyryn-Containing Electrodesign Catalase and Peroxidase-Type Biomimetic Sensor "Book" Biomimetic Based Applications", Preface IX, Chapter4, 2011, p.105-123 under the editorship of Anne George, Croatia.

 

Abstract:

The inducing effect of hydrogen peroxide on synchronous monooxidation reaction of hydrocarbons in the presence of biomimetic catalysts is accompanied by two interrelated and interacting - coherent reactions. The decomposition reaction of H2O2 (primary) forms a biomimetic catalytic intermediate, in the interaction of which with the substrate, its transformation occurs in a secondary reaction-coherently synchronized with it.

The mechanism of such coherent-synchronized reactions is considered in the process of heterogeneously catalyzed monooxidation of cyclohexane by hydrogen peroxide in the gas phase in the presence of a biomimetic catalyst, which is described by the following generalized scheme:

It follows from this scheme that the primary H2O2 decomposition reaction forms highly active hydroperoxide active center ImtOOH, which interacts with cyclohexane by forming the desired products (secondary reactions) - C6H11OH, C6H10O, C6H10 and C6H8.

As a biomimetic catalyst was used per-FTPhPFe(III)OH/Al2O3, which synthesized on the basis of the iron-porphyrin complex, simulating the catalytic functions of the enzyme of the oxoreductase-catalase and monooxygenase group, which are distinguished by their selective and highly active action and necessary for the creation of effective biomimics.

Experimental study of the monooxidation reaction of cyclohexane shows that the process of formation of cyclohexanone, cyclohexanol and cyclohexene proceeds along a sequentially parallel mechanism, which can be represented as the following scheme:

Each stage indicated in this scheme proceeds according to the previously described coherently synchronized mechanism.

 

 

Speaker
Biography:

Carla Gomes research interests are in the area of sustainable synthesis, microwave-assisted organic synthesis and mechanochemistry specially related to the synthesis of heterocycles. She has presented three orals communications and three posters with two of them winning the best poster prize.

Abstract:

The remarkable versatility of porphyrins and their derivatives, clearly demonstrated by the large number of applications, relies in a great length on the development and improvement of synthetic strategies that, over the years, made possible the huge availability of these compounds. The synthesis of meso-substituted porphyrins from pyrrole and aldehyde involves the cyclization to obtain the porphyrinogen and the oxidation to aromatize it to porphyrin. With the awakening for the environmental issues and the establishment of Green Chemistry began the search for new synthetic methodologies often using new tools such as microwave or mechanochemistry. In this communication we report the synthesis of porphyrins using mechanochemistry. The influence of the ball milling process in the cyclization and oxidation step, the acid catalyst, the oxidant, the substitution at the aldehyde and the presence and type of solvent will be discussed.

Speaker
Biography:

Haley Irving completed their B.A. in Chemistry at Pitzer College, of the Claremont College Consortium in Los Angeles California and is currently enrolled in the chemistry PhD program at Portland State University with the McCormick Photochemistry group.  Haley expects to graduate with a PhD in 2021.  Haley’s current research involves coupled experimental and computational characterization of tellurorhodamine photocatalysts for aerobic oxidation catalysis.  Haley is also acting as Vice President of the PSU Women in STEM.
 

 

Abstract:

Homogeneous metal-catalyzed aerobic oxidation reactions have been of increasing interest due to thepotential in green industrial applications. However, some industrially implemented methods require stoichiometric amounts of halogenated sacrificial electron acceptor to oxidize the Mn to M(n+2), the active oxidant species. Organochalchogen dyes, and more specifically tellurium-containing dyes, have been demonstrated to photocatalytically oxidize thiols without the use of chemical oxidants. Computational modeling coupled to experimental results allows further understanding of oxidation and reduction mechanism associated with this catalytic cycle. This reaction is catalyzed by a visible-light-active, self-sensitized, tellurium-containing chromophore under ambient temperature and pressure. The tellurium-containing chromophore is a rhodamine-derivative that is photo-oxidized to the active telluroxide species without the addition of a photosensitizer or external oxidant (besides atmospheric oxygen). The mechanism of telluroxide formation and thiol to disulfide transformation were determined computationally and are supported by results from stop-flow spectroscopy experiments.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Chung-Hsin Wu received a Doctorate in Environmental Engineering from National Taiwan University in 1999 and Dr. Wu joined the faculty of Chemical and Materials Engineering at National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology in 2010 as a Professor. Prof. Wu’s research interest includes treatment processes for contaminated waters and hazardous chemicals, for which seven Taiwan patents have been issued. Prof. Wu is currently working on the synthesis of novel photocatalysts. Prof. Wu has reviewed over 300 papers submitted for publication to various journals and he has authored over 100 journal papers and 80 conference presentations and seminars.

 

Abstract:

A hydrothermal process is utilized to synthesize silver orthovanadate (Ag3VO4, AVO), bismuth orthovanadate (BiVO4, BVO) and BiVO4/Ag3VO4 composite (BVO/AVO). The precursors of AVO were silver nitrate (AgNO3) and sodium orthovanadate (Na3VO4), and those of BVO were bismuth nitrate (Bi(NO3)3) and ammonium metavanadate (NH4VO3). The Bi/Ag molar ratio in the BVO/AVO preparation was 1/3. The effects of heating time (6, 12 and 24h) and temperature (393, 433 and 473K) on the synthesis of AVO were elucidated. C.I. Reactive Red 2 (RR2) was used as the parent compound in evaluating the photocatalytic activity of all prepared photocatalysts. The optimal experimental conditions for synthesizing AVO by the hydrothermal method included initial heating at 393 K for 6 h. A 400 W Xe lamp was used as the light source. A quartz appliance that was filled with 2 M NaNO2 solution was placed on the top of the photo-reactor to filter out the ultraviolent (UV) and to provide visible-light (Vis). The rates of RR2 photodegradation by all photocatalysts under UV and Vis irradiation followed a pseudo-first-order kinetic model. The RR2 photodegradation rate constants in the UV/AVO, Vis/AVO, UV/BVO, Vis/BVO, UV/BVO/AVO, Vis/BVO/AVO and solar/BVO/AVO systems were 1.43, 0.03, 0.55, 0.16, 5.06, 2.39 and 2.48 hr-1, respectively. BVO/AVO exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity of all the prepared photocatalysts. This investigation suggested that the coupling of BVO greatly inhibited the recombination of photo-generated electron-hole pairs in AVO, revealing that the separation of photo-generated electron-hole pairs in BVO/AVO was more efficient than that in AVO. Adding isopropanol to the RR2 solution slightly reduced the rate of RR2 photodegradation but adding Cr(VI) and EDTA-2Na markedly slowed RR2 photodegradation. The experimental results suggested that the photogenerated holes and superoxide radicals were the main oxidative species for RR2 photodegradation in AVO and BVO/AVO systems.    

 

Biography:

Abstract:

World population is now increasing, and the United Nations predicts that the world population will be 9.8 billion by 2050. As a result, higher food production is required. One of the solutions is the use of pesticides. In order to achieve higher food production, the burden on the environment has to be smaller and more sustainable. In view of this fact, microbial pesticides have attracted attention in recent years. Microbial pesticides are agents that use cells and/or the substances produced by microorganisms and inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic fungi. Compared with chemical pesticides, microbial pesticides are less likely to remain in the environment, and it is difficult to develop drug-resistant bacteria. Therefore, we focused on Bacillus bacteria in this study. Bacillus bacteria are broadly distributed microbial microorganisms in the soil. It is reported that bacteria of the genus Bacillus form spores and biofilms and are resistant to growth inhibitory conditions. Using Bacillus subtilis strain RB14, which is known to produce iturin A, an antifungal substance, we examined the influence of medium concentration on biofilm formation and the production of antibiotic substance. The relationship between biofilm formation and antifungal substance production was clearly observed, and it was shown that antifungal substance was produced after biofilm formation. We have previously observed the biofilm formation in the medium with the agriculture residues. Using these properties, the experiment to increase the production amount of antifungal substance is under consideration.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

In recent years the food problem has become serious as the world population increases. As a consequence, further productivity improvement is required in agriculture. The control of phytopathogens which adversely affect crops, in particular, is indispensable for stable crop production. Currently, chemical pesticides are mainstream as a means to do so, but also microbial pesticides having various effects are attracting attention. As a candidate of microbial pesticide, our laboratory has isolated actinomycetes with antimicrobial activity against multiple phytopathogens. These actinomycetes produce gaseous antimicrobial substances. In order to gain insights on Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) derived from actinomycetes, we focused on actinomycetes AR3, AR4 and AR10 strains which were found to be effective in the infection control experiments. First, the effects of VOCs derived from actinomycetes on growth of phytopathogens were investigated. actinomycetes spore suspension was applied to the surface of the PDA medium and cultured for 3 days. After that, the petri plate with agar pieces of phytopathogen was inverted on top of the plate with actinomycetes and both plates were sealed and cultured for several days. As a result, the growth of phytopathogens was suppressed. In addition, VOCs derived from actinomycetes were subjected to GC-MS analysis. An adsorbent was placed inside a petri dish coated with actinomycetes and incubated for 3 days to adsorb VOCs. The adsorbent was extracted, and subjected to GC-MS analysis. As a result, very similar peaks were detected in AR3 and AR4 strains. We are currently trying to identify VOCs, including analysis of AR10 strain.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

Currently, energy supply source from fossil fuels have ploblems such as depletion of petroleum and greenhouse gas emissions. Under the circumstances, demand for renewable and sustainable energy is increasing and the alternative energy sources other than fossil fuels are expected. Soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are devices that using microbes in the soil as biocatalysts to convert chemical energy to electricity. These are expected as an application to produce sustainable energy. But it is still a long way to go before SMFC is practically applied. One of the problems is low power generation by SMFC operation. Here, we focused on soil ecosystems, specifically the earthworms which are known to improve soil-fertility by degrading fallen leaves or plant litter and  we investigated the effect of earthworm on power generation of SMFC. Earthworms were added to  SMFC and the maximum power density and the internal resistance were compared to SMFC with and without earthworms. As a results, The power density increased by 800% and the internal resistance decreased by 91.5%. The soil structure of SMFC with and without earthworms was different and the clear soil aggregate structure was found in SMFC with earthworms, which had been made with the passage of soil through the earthworm gut. The results indicated that adding earthworms had a significant effect on the SMFC performance, especially the power and soil structure, and it is suggested that this system would contribute to the sustainable and rewewable energy source.