Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 9th World Congress on Green Chemistry and Technology Amsterdam, Netherlands | Hyatt Place Amsterdam Airport | Rijnlanderweg 800, 2132 NN Hoofddorp .

Day 3 :

Keynote Forum

Bharti Khungar

Birla Institute of Technology and Science Pilani, India

Keynote: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications of Imidazolium Ion-tagged Metal Complexes

Time : 9:30-10:10

Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry-2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Bharti Khungar photo
Biography:

Dr. Bharti Khungar is an Associate Professor and Head, Department of Chemistry, BITS Pilani, Pilani Campus, India. She carried out her doctoral research in Chemistry at University of Rajasthan, Jaipur, India and obtained the Ph.D. degree in 2002. She is working in the field green chemistry for synthesis, characterization and applications ion-tagged moieties. These ion-tagged molecules have been screened for biological applications, and catalytic properties on complexation with metal ions.

 

Abstract:

Transition metal complexes are extensively used as a catalyst in many organic reactions, due to their facile synthesis and versatile catalytic activity depending on the nature of metal coordinated to the ligands.1 The poor solubility of the catalyst in organic and aqueous media, its recovery and recyclability restrict their use in different organic transformations. This limitation can be overcome by using an ion tag strategy, where ionic tag is linked to the catalyst skeleton resulting in its efficient entrapment in organic solvents as well as in water with improved catalytic activity and recyclability.2-3 Inspired by these properties of ion tagged catalysts, a novel route to synthesize imidazolium ion-tagged ligands and their metal complexes has been devised. The synthesized compounds have been characterized by IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. The catalytic applications of these metal complexes have been explored for various organic transformations. Short reaction time, simple workup, reuse of the catalyst up to many cycles without much loss of activity in aqueous medium are the main advantages of the protocol. 

  • Biomass and its Conversion | Environmental Chemistry and Pollu􀆟 on Control | Green Chemistry and Technology
Location: Meeting Place 2
Speaker

Chair

Bharthi Khungar

Birla Institute of Technology and Science (BITS) Pilani, India

Session Introduction

Rabya Aslam

University of the Punjab, Pakistan

Title: Alumina Extraction from Pakistani Bauxite and activity testing on biofuel production from waste cooking oil

Time : 10:00-10:30

Speaker
Biography:

Rabya Aslam has completed her PhD from University of Erlangen Nuremberg Germany in 2016. Currently, she is working as Assistant Professor at University of the Punjab, lahore Pakistan. She has published more than 15 papers in repured journals.

 

Abstract:

Waste cooking oil is valuable and cheap feedstock for the production of bio-fuels as compared to virgin edible oil. It can not only help to reduce environmental impacts of waste cooking oil but also can contribute to the future energy demand. Catalysts used in this process are usually acids, base in both homogeneous and heterogeneous processes. In most cases, sodium hydroxide and potassium hydroxide are used as alkaline catalyst and mineral acids are used as acidic catalysts in homogeneous reaction, because of their higher reaction rates, availability and low cost. However, recovery of catalyst is difficult in this process. Moreover, in the case of waste cooking oil which contain relatively high percentage of free fatty acid, alkaline catalysts are prone to the saponification reaction which reduce the biodiesel conversions. In order to cope up with low biofuel conversion, slow reaction rates, activity of solid catalysts are evaluated in this work. The activity of in house synthesized Alumina from Pakistani Bauxite is studied by varying reaction conditions such as time, temperature, alcohol to oil ratio. The produced biodiesel was fully characterized with respect to density, kinematic density, iodine values, acid values, carbon residue, pour points, flash points etc. and was found to meet the criteria required to be diesel substitute.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Fionn Ó Fearghail is a postgraduate researcher in the Radiation and Environmental Science Centre (RESC) and NanoLab in the FOCAS Institute at the Dublin Institute of Technology. His research focuses on development of analytical techniques for the detailed characterization of marine sourced bio-polymers and bio-active compounds. Fionn also works towards up-scaling of sustainable processing and extraction of raw materials for valorisation of waste streams by enhancing understanding of the chemical and physical properties of raw and extracted marine sourced materials.

 

Abstract:

Solid state 13C CP-MAS NMR was optimised for the accurate determination of %Degree of Acetylation (%DA) using a range of extracted chitin and chitosan standards. Application of the optimised 13C CP-MAS NMR technique, along with FTIR and Raman spectroscopy for qualitative analysis, determined the %DA of fisheries waste-stream chitin isolated from brown crab, Cancer Pagurus, as being from 91-100% and of high purity. The extraction procedure was optimised, under principles of green chemistry and for ease of up-scaling for industrial application, by review of literature and replicate studies. Extraction is shown to be necessary for accurate analysis as determined by comparison of 13C CP-MAS NMR, FTIR and Raman spectra of both raw and extracted samples. An analytical suite consisting of these techniques is proposed as a standard reproducible method for the accurate characterisation of crustacean sourced chitin.

 

 

Axel Kosider

Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), Germany

Title: Recycling of heterogeneous catalysts for the room-temperature decomposition of aqueous formic acid mixtures

Time : 11:20-11:50

Speaker
Biography:

Axel Kosider graduated with a Master’s Degree in Chemical Engineering from the Technical Faculty at the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU). Kosider became interested in research at the Lehrstuhl für Chemische Reaktionstechnik (CRT) during his semester abroad in South Korea at the FAU Busan Campus. During his studies, Kosider worked as a research assistant at CRT, where he then wrote his master’s thesis. In 2015 he began his PhD in the research group of Prof. Dr. Peter Wasserscheid.


 

Abstract:

Alternatives to fossil fuels as an energy source are necessary to reach a sustainable tomorrow. A green, renewable and promising energy carrier is formic acid that can be decomposed to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. With a hydrogen capacity of 4.3 wt%, formic acid delivers hydrogen that can be converted to electricity in fuel cells. The decomposition of the acid takes place at mild reaction conditions. With heterogeneous palladium catalysts, the dehydrogenation of aqueous formic acid happens at room temperature and ambient pressure with high selectivity of hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Because of the moderate reaction conditions, hydrogen is obtained on-demand and can be converted to energy. The source for sustainable, green and renewable formic acid is the conversion of biomass to aqueous formic acid. With the help of homogeneous catalysts, biological waste is converted to aqueous formic acid that can be used as green energy carrier. However, while decomposing aqueous formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, heterogeneous palladium catalysts deactivate within a short time scale. Within a few hours, the activity of the catalyst decreases dramatically so that it is necessary to regenerate the catalytic active material. Regenerating the poisoned heterogeneous palladium catalysts is possible so that the precious metal can be reused for the dehydrogenation of aqueous formic acid. By recycling the palladium catalysts, it is feasible to use formic acid as a renewable and green liquid hydrogen storage chemical.

 

Biography:

Mrs. Dina Abbas Ahmed Mostafa has completed her Master's degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences on September 2015 from Ain Shams University and has been enrolled on May 2016 for the Ph.D. degree as a Ph.D. student and still registered for this degree. She is currently working as assistant lecturer at faculty of pharmaceutical sciences and pharmaceutical industries at Future University in Egypt, Cairo, Egypt.

 Mrs. Dina Abbas participated in many local and international conferences:

  • 3rd FUE International Conference of Pharmaceutical Sciences ( February 9-11, 2015, Cairo, Egypt)
  • 2nd Annual International Conference on Pharmaceutical Sciences ( May 4-7, 2015, Athens, Greece)
  • 4th FUE International Conference of Pharmaceutical Sciences ( 31 January-2 February , 2017, Cairo, Egypt)
  • 8th International Scientific Conference ( March 2-3, 2017, Cairo, Egypt)

 

Abstract:

Acquisition of the dissolution profiles of more than single active ingredient in a multi-component pharmaceutical formulation is dominated by utilization of the off-line spectroscopic and chromatographic methods. In this approach, a “Double-Dip” green analytical chemistry (GAC) approach with the ultimate goal of advancing the in-line potentiometric sensors to their most effective use for simultaneous acquisition of the dissolution curves of two active ingredients in a binary pharmaceutical dosage form, Brufen Flu is adopted. For the proof of concept, two sensitive and selective sensors were developed for the simultaneous determination of the cationic Pseudoephedrine (PSE) and the anionic Ibuprofen (IBU) drugs in order to monitor their dissolution profiles without sample pretreatment or derivatization. For the determination of the cationic drug (PSE), sensor I was developed using potassium tetrakis (4-chlorophenyl)borate (KTCPB) as a cationic exchanger, while sensor II was developed for the determination of the anionic IBU using tridodecyl methyl ammonium chloride (TDC) as an anionic exchanger using 2-nitrophenyl octyl ether (2-NPOE) as a plasticizer for both used sensors. The use of these novel sensors not only provides a way for the determination of PSE and IBU in bulk powder, in laboratory mixtures and in combined dosage form but also permits simultaneous in-line monitoring of their dissolution profiles. The advantages of the newly introduced “Double-Dip” approach are highlighted and the merits of these benign real-time analyzers (ISEs) that can deliver equivalent analytical results as HPLC and UV-spectrophotometry while significantly reducing solvent consumption/waste generation in addition to the manipulation steps are described.

 

Speaker
Biography:

Nadia El Ouahedy is pursuing her PhD from University of Chouaib Doukkali in Morocco and University of Poitiers in France working on depollution of water by hybrid system as a part of the project PHC Maghreb 2016. She is preparing adsorbents from olive waste from Morocco, such as the charcoal prepared by the hydrothermal carbonization process at Triers University in Germany and activated carbon at University of Poitiers in France and Oulu University in Finland, to apply them for the adsorption of Bisphenol A and Diuron followed by a catalytic oxidation of those pollutants.

Abstract:

       In the present study, we have investigated the adsorption, by activated carbon prepared from olive stones, of two pollutants, Bisphenol A, a substance causes a disruption of endocrine systems and ubiquity in the aquatic environment, and Diuron, a pesticide detected in groundwater and may reach higher levels than health-based standards. The olive stones were chemically activated and then pyrolysed (thermal treatment under nitrogen). On the other hand, to optimize the preparation method, the effect of the main process parameters (such as activating agent used, impregnation ratio, temperature of pyrolysis step) on the performances of the obtained activated carbons (expressed in terms of adsorption capacity of BPA and Diuron and specific surface area) was studied. The physicochemical properties of the activated carbon prepared were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption, FTIR, SEM, X-Ray diffraction, CHNS and TGA/DTA. To optimize the adsorption parameters of the activated carbon, preliminary experiments were achieved, such as the effects of solution initial pH and temperature, effect of initial concentration of the pollutants. Promising performances were pointed out as 70 % of Diuron and 92 % of BPA can be removed from aqueous solution for an initial concentration respectively 35 mg/L and 20 mg/L, when the usual concentrations of BPA in environmental waters are in the range of 10 ng/L to 400 μg/L and Diuron is around 1 600 ng/L. This innovative process is based on valorization of agricultural waste biomass, of which billions of kilograms are produced annually, to low cost but efficient adsorbent that can contribute to environmental remediation.

Speaker
Biography:

Jialu Li is currently pursuing her PhD at University of Poitiers.

Abstract:

Furans as well as its derivatives are platform chemicals, subsequently transformed to value-added products such as pharmaceutical intermediates, fuel additives, bio-based surfactant and solvents. 2,5-dimetylfuran (DMF), a prominent platform molecule, can be obtained via the selective hydroghenation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural [1]. Despite its outstanding properties, nearly ideal boiling point, high energy density, high research octane number and being immiscible with water[2], it can also be further valorised. Nonetheless, the amount of furanic derivatives synthesized from DMF is limited due to the complexity of the functionalization of the methyl group. Here, for the first time, we described a convenient catalytic pathway to functionalize methyl group of DMF by using hydrolyzation product 2,5-hexanedione[3]as key an intermediate.

A three-step strategy is employed (Figure 1). Starting from (1) 2,5-dimethylfuran, hydrolyzation of DMF to hexane-2,5-dione is performed in presence of an acid catalyst; (2) then hexane-2,5-dione reacts with and aldehyde in the presence of a basic catalyst; followed by (3) a hydrogenation/cyclization by metal support catalyst to obtain methyltetrahydrofuran derivatives.

Figure 1: Strategy to synthesis functionalized 2-methyl THF derivatives

The screening of acid catalysts for the first step and basic-catalysts for the second step was investigated leading to interesting yields to the desired products. Base on these results, the feasibility of one-pot reaction starting directly from 2,5-DMF and aldehydes was demonstrated. The third step (hydrogenation/cyclization) was studied and 80% of the final target product was achieved. A theoretical approach combined with an experimental approach revealed that the reaction temperature is a key parameter in this step. The recyclability of the catalysts in all the three steps was also studied.

 

Biography:

Kevin Speina is a graduate student in the Department of Chemistry at Princeton University. Currently, he is pursuing his PhD in Bioinorganic Chemistry. He has graduated from Manhattan College with a BS in Chemistry and Minors in Philosophy, Religion, and Mathematics. His interests in green chemistry and entrepreneurship has kindled a passion for pursing research and development; particularly focused on bringing products from lab bench to market. He is a first-generation student for both his Bachelor’s and Doctoral degree.

 

Abstract:

The non-reactive nature of aliphatic C-H bonds makes catalytic oxyfunctionalization, under ambient conditions profoundly difficult. Overcoming this challenge has the potential of transforming low cost, abundant hydrocarbons (i.e. methane, cyclooctane) into low cost precursor molecules capable of derivatization; an industrially advantageous enterprise. Fortunately, nature evolved enzymatic catalysts able to perform oxygenation onto relatively inert C-H bonds. Cytochrome P450s (P450) are a class of monooxygenases that incorporate molecular oxygen onto aliphatic C-H bonds with remarkable regio- and stereoselectivity. Unfortunately, P450 enzymes require a prohibitively expensive cofactor NAD(P)H and reductases to perform oxyfunctionalization reactions. A class of enzymes known as fungal aromatic peroxygenases (APOs) circumvents this limitation by using H2O2 as a co-substrate to generate the iron (IV) oxo porphyrin cation radical intermediate for C-H functionalization. APO enzymes are stable, extracellular, glycosylated proteins that have no sequence homology to P450 analogs yet have enhanced reactivity to P450 enzymes. Herein, a recently identified APO from Marasmius rotula [MroAPO] was found to be stable in the presence of organic solvents such as acetonitrile and acetone (up to 50v%). Even more remarkable is its propensity to form ketones from alkanes in high yields. Simply by adding 0.05% mol of MroAPO in acetone with excess oxidant, alkane substrates such as cyclooctane and decane are transformed to the corresponding ketone products with 90+% yield. A total turnover number (TTN) of 50000 was calculated for cyclooctane oxidation. This is the second highest TTN reported for cyclooctane. Astonishingly, enzymatic reactions with C10-C6 linear alkanes results in the 2-ketone product, with minute amounts of side products. The 2-ketone products are desirable for the fragrance and food industries. Thus, the reactions catalyzed by MroAPO enzymes have promising biotechnical potential insofar their versatility is unmatched to any known catalyst.