Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 11th World Congress on Green Chemistry and Technology Geneva, Switzerland.

Day 1 :

Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker T.Nagiev                                                                                      photo
Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Conference Series Euro Green Chemistry 2020 International Conference Keynote Speaker Lucian Lucia photo
Biography:

Dr. Lucian A. Lucia currently serves as an Associate Professor in the Departments of Forest Biomaterials (Wood & Paper Science) and Chemistry and as a faculty in the programs of Fiber & Polymer Science and Environmental Sciences at North Carolina State University. His laboratory, The Laboratory of Soft Materials & Green Chemistry, probes fundamental materials science topics focused on the green chemistry of renewable polymers. He received his Ph.D. in organic chemistry from the University of Florida for modeling photoinduced charge separation states of novel Rhenium (I)-based organometallic ensembles as a first order approximation of photosynthesis.

Abstract:

The development of an innovative interfacial wetting strategy known as liquid infused systems offers great promise for design of super-wetting and super-antiwetting substrates that overcome the drawbacks of textured surfaces classified as Cassie/Wenzel states. The value of such nature-inspired surfaces can address practical scientific and technological challenges within interfacial chemistry such as ease of manufacture, separation efficiency, rechargeability, anti-fouling, and robustness. For example, we demonstrate that nanocellulose fibers from bacteria can form a high-performance three-dimensional crosslinked network confining a dispersed liquid medium such as water that leads to interfacial engineering marvels. More specifically, the strong chemical and physical interactions between dispersed water molecules and entangled cellulosic network endow these substrates with effective liquid separation capabilities.

 

  • Biomass and Bio-energy
Location: Geneva, Switzerland

Chair

Ms.Isha Sharma

Session Introduction

Isha Sharma

part-time PhD at Queensland University of Technology

Title: Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Sugarcane Bagasse Anaerobic Digestion Digestate into Phenolics and Hythane
Biography:

Isha Sharma is undertaking part-time PhD at Queensland University of Technology, Australia. She has been serving the Department of Environment and Science, Queensland since 2010, currently as Team Leader within the End of Waste Team. Isha holds Master’s degree in Environmental Science from Bharathiar University, India with her research article published in Elsevier Waste Management Journal in 2009. Since 2005, Isha has been working in waste-management sector internationally including that with UNDP, IUCN and Winrock International. Isha has co-authored the book “Biogas as Renewable Sources of Energy in Nepal: Theory and Development” published by AEPC, Nepal Government in 2015.

 

Abstract:

Green house emissions leading to environmental issues, declining petroleum reserves and energy security concerns have promoted the current exploration of sustianable green options. This includes conversion of wastes to energy as well as to platform chemicals for the chemical and polymer industries. Hydrothermal treatment of wet biomass waste opens up the possibilities of combined fuel production and wastewater treatment in both industrial and densely populated areas where large amounts of wet waste materials are available. In this study, we proposed an integrated process where the digestate from anaerobic digestion of lignocellulosics can be transformed into valuable products. Firstly, the wet solids of the digestate are converted into phenolic compounds, a key building block for the preparation of polymers and resins, by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). Thereafter, the generated waste aqueous stream, a by-product of the HTL process, is subjected to hydrothermal gasification (HTG) to produce gaseous fuel - hydrogen and methane (i.e., hythane). To facilitate these thermochemical transformations, we prepared a series of novel iron catalysts doped on potassium feldspar. These synthesized cheaper catalysts provided high yields of phenolics with high selectivity for phenol and 4-ethylphenol. The aqueous stream comprised mainly of lactic acid, glycolic acid and glycerol. Hydrothermal gasification of this by-product was evaluated using Ru/C, Ru/Al2O3 and La/Ce2O3 catalysts. Ru/C and La/Ce2O3 gave high yields of hythane with minor amounts of C2-C3 hydrocarbons, CO and N. Overall, the integrated process resulted in the production of energy, chemicals and re-usable water.

 

 

Dr. Ihesinachi A. Kalagbor

Chief lecturer and Director, Research & Development Centre, Ken Saro-Wiwa Polytechnic Bori

Title: BIO-ENERGY FROM WASTE PAW-PAW FRUITS AND PEELS USING SINGLE MICROBIAL FUEL CELLS
Biography:

Dr. Ihesinachi A. Kalagbor obtained a Ph.D degree in Analytical Chemistry from University of Port-Harcourt, Rivers State Nigeria in 2006.  She is a Chief lecturer and Director, Research & Development Centre, Ken Saro-Wiwa Polytechnic Bori.  She has carried out a lot of research on heavy metals in water, soil, fruits, vegetables and crops. To date, she has supervised 96 students to graduation in Chemistry. She is involved with a team of researchers in her institution working on a pilot scheme for the generation of electricity using waste organic materials.  She has published 33 papers in reputed journals. She is a Fellow of Institute of Chartered Chemistry of Nigeria (FICCON), Member, Royal Society of Chemistry (MRSC), Member, International Water Association (MIWA) and Affiliate Member of IUPAC. She is currently the coordinator, Women in Chemistry (WIC) Rivers Chapter, Nigeria.

 

Abstract:

Most of the energy around the world comes from non-renewable sources, including coal, petroleum, oil and natural gases. Microbial fuel cells are an alternative source of generating electricity using microorganisms on biomass. Paw-paw is an example of biomass and commonly known as papaya fruit. It contains sugar and other ingredients with sufficient chemical energy that can be converted  into electrical energy by means of redox reaction. The generation of electricity from waste pawpaw fruits and peels using microbial fuel cells, is one of the approach to meet the population demand for energy. The conversion of waste pawpaw into electricity would not only produce electricity but will also serve as one of the  means of recycling waste that is causing environmental pollution. The graphite used for the electrodes we obtained from waste finger batteries. The results obtained from this research shows that the voltage and current produced from the 20 kg paw-paw waste was capable of lighting a 2V bulb. The decrease in voltage and current with time was as a result of decrease in the organic matter contents of the substrate used. The dissolved Oxygen (DO). Biochemical oxygen Demand (BOD) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) decreased with increase in the duration of the of energy production. It has therefore shown that this fruit waste can be used to generate electricity. It is therefore recommended that more study should be carried out on production of electricity from fruit waste.

 

Most of the energy around the world comes from non-renewable sources, including coal, petroleum, oil and natural gases. Microbial fuel cells are an alternative source of generating electricity using microorganisms on biomass. Paw-paw is an example of biomass and commonly known as papaya fruit. It contains sugar and other ingredients with sufficient chemical energy that can be converted  into electrical energy by means of redox reaction. The generation of electricity from waste pawpaw fruits and peels using microbial fuel cells, is one of the approach to meet the population demand for energy. The conversion of waste pawpaw into electricity would not only produce electricity but will also serve as one of the  means of recycling waste that is causing environmental pollution. The graphite used for the electrodes we obtained from waste finger batteries. The results obtained from this research shows that the voltage and current produced from the 20 kg paw-paw waste was capable of lighting a 2V bulb. The decrease in voltage and current with time was as a result of decrease in the organic matter contents of the substrate used. The dissolved Oxygen (DO). Biochemical oxygen Demand (BOD) and Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) decreased with increase in the duration of the of energy production. It has therefore shown that this fruit waste can be used to generate electricity. It is therefore recommended that more study should be carried out on production of electricity from fruit waste.

 

Biography:

Abstract:

Energy is the first and foremost essential factor for modern developmental activities, such as movement of goods and services, driving the industrial machines and ensuring agricultural production. Energy plays a pivotal role in our daily lives. Today energy scarcity is everywhere all over the world. Day by day the energy crisis is becoming more and more dire, on the other hand natural resources is being consumed at an alarming rate. Our natural environment is being degraded in numerous ways due to unplanned human activities. If the deterioration of the natural environment is continued in such a manner there is a possibility that earth will no longer be suitable for human survival. Scientists, politicians and social activists are paying serious attention to discovering possible new arena of energy sources as well as implementing new technology to save our environment for future generations. Alternate sources of energy are an important research field in today’s world. A great deal of research and development has focused on biomass, solar, wind, bio fuel, biodiesel, geothermal, to name a few. These alternate energy sources of energy have certain limitations; some are not technically sound, others are not economically viable or environmentally friendly. Waste Technologies LLC (WTL) has developed a ground breaking technology in the conversion of waste plastics into liquid hydrocarbon fuel. WTL technology is capable of converting almost all types of abundant waste plastics into hydrocarbon fuel that can power any internal combustion engine. WTL is expanding its unique technologies and building commercial faculties in all over the world.

Biography:

Pieter Imhof holds degrees in chemistry and economics, and has a Ph.D. in organometallic chemistry from the University of Amsterdam.Pieter joined Akzo Nobel in 1996 where he has held various management positions in Research & Development, Technical Service, Marketing and Product Development. In 2005 he took up responsibility for Business Development, Sales & Marketing as well as Strategic Account Management at Avantium. In 2017 Pieter joined BioBTX as CEO, mainly oriented at commercialization of BioBTX’ Integrated Cascading Catalytic pyrolysis technology for the sustainable production of aromatics from biomass and end-of-life materials.     


 

 

Abstract:

Plastics bring a lot of of positives to the society due to the properties they could bring, like low weight, chemical resistance, transparency, strength, barrier properties, etc. And consequntly they can be used in wide range of products and applications. The downside of using plastic is the impact it currently has on environment, due to use of fossil resources for its production, CO2 impact during production, but also due to end-of-life and people behavioral effects, like waste in environment, landfill or incineration. Various technology solutions are being sought to minimize these negative effects, while maintaining the positive aspects. Examples are bio-based building blocks and polymers, mechanical and chemical recycling.BioBTX has developed technologies that enable the conversion of both biomass and end-of-life materials into platform chemicals, i.c. aromatics, especially BTX (Benzene, Toluene, Xylenes). These are the basis of 40% of all polymers produced worldwide.Applying this technology allows achievement of circularity and sustainability targets, like CO2 reduction, minimization of use of fossil resources, lower waste by making chemical building blocks from current waste streams form agriculture, plastics, composiites, etc.In the presentation examples will be given on the flexibility of the technology and its impacton products, performance and environment.

 

Biography:

Fabrizio Olivito is Postdoctoral researcher at the University of Calabria, Italy, under the supervision of Prof. Antonio De Nino. He obtained the Master’s degree in chemistry at the University of Calabria in 2015 and, after that, he completed his PhD studies in 2019 at the University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Italy, under the supervision of Prof. Antonio Procopio. He spent the second year of his PhD at the University of California, Davis, under the supervision of Prof. Mark Mascal. 

Abstract:

Lignocellulosic materials are widespread in nature and cellulose represents the main component.1 Due to the high stability of this natural polymer, the depolymerisation and/or conversion into useful materials, under mild conditions, is still a challenge today.2,3 Our research group recently developed a new approach for the contemporary cellulose depolymerisation and functionalization into bio-oil and cellulose-citrate, under short times, solvent free conditions and atmospheric pressure.4Cellulose is mixed with citric acid at the melting point of the acid. After the reaction time, bio-oil is extracted with a common organic solvent, while esterified cellulose is collected as a solid. The open air system and the three acidic functionalities of citric acid lead cellulose depolymerisation.The obtained oil is composed  mainly of furan compounds, recovered  in excellent yields. Chemical characterization of this bio-oil was carried out. Cellulose hydrolysis is accompanied by an esterification reaction and the product in the form of cellulose-citrate was also collected in high yields and characterized. A computational study of the mechanism was also investigated.This reaction represents an important breakthrough in the field of biomass conversion, because two useful materials are produced from cellulose, by a green, fast and safe approach. Citric acid is a mild organic acid that is widely abundant in nature. Bio-oil can be converted into fuel additives while cellulose citrate with its thermoplastic properties can be used as a biodegradable material for many purposes.

 

Biography:

Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. Professor & Associate Dean, Research at JECRC University, Jaipur, India. Also, Series Editor for Springer's Book Series- "Green Chemistry for Suatainabilty",and authored several books and research papers of international repute so far.
 

Abstract:

Chemistry is very much required and responsible for industrial development and technological advancement. Green chemistry1 is nothing but an extension of chemistry principles to serve the sustainability of the environment.It has the potential to address the challenges threatening the sustainable civilization.It is a set of 12 principles given by Paul Anastas and John Warner to serve the society with a modern version of chemistry which is less toxic less hazardous, highly efficient and non-polluting.2Unfortunately, the education system especially in developing countries is not very enthusiastic and welcoming towards acceptance of green chemistry in their curriculum. In many countries, students, as well as teachers, are not even aware of the philosophy and the applications of green chemistry in daily life. They don’t know its benefits in industrial development.Therefore, it is quite an unfortunate situation and a challenging one at the same time.Green chemistry does not feature yet in any K12 curriculum in India and students Start learning about it the first time at the college level only. The only direct reference to environmental chemistry topics the closest to green chemistryis found in the syllabi of K12 schools but still there is a lot of confusion Between these 2 terms.Therefore it is the need of the day that K12 chemistry curriculum allows sufficient space for fundamental principles of green chemistry and its applications which not only will be helpful to the teenage students in their day-to-day learning but also will be an added advantage to them in becoming a responsible citizen as well as a seasoned professional.In the present talk, I would try to discussthe need and the necessity of greening of chemistry curriculum at K12 level. I'm sure It would be beneficial for not only students but also the teachers as well.

 

Biography:

Adam P. Zarecki has completed his Master thesis from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznan, Poland. In 2015 he commenced doctoral studies at the Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences under the supervision of Prof. Wojciech T. Markiewicz and co-supervision of dr Jacek L. Kolanowski. His research interests include microwave assisted organic synthesis, amides, green chemistry, natural product, pharmaceutical chemistry.   
 

 

Abstract:

Amide bonds are among the most widely abundant and fascinating types of linkages in organic synthesis and nature. They constitute the backbone of peptides and proteins and are important elementary linkages in many natural products and polymers. In addition, thanks to their stability in biological environments, they are often used in the construction of various drugs, insecticides, nutraceutics and chemical tools to study and modify biology. We demonstrate a microwave-assisted method for the direct solvent-free synthesis of amides from amines and carboxylic acids. This high efficiency, robustness, short reaction times, solvent-free and additional reagent-free method provides a major advancement in the development of an ideal green protocol for amide bond formation. The amide product isolation procedure is simple, environmentally friendly, and is performed with no need for chromatographic purification of secondary amides thanks to high yields. This methodology generates a limited amount of wastes, and a catalyst can be easily separated. The reactions are carried out in an open microwave reactor and allow the corresponding amides to be obtained in a fast and effective manner when compared to other procedures of the direct synthesis of amides from acids and amines reported so far in the literature.

Akram Alabadi

Employee in South Refineries Company, Basrah, Iraq

Title: N-Doped Porous Activated Carbon Monolith Using for CO2/N2 Selectivity
Biography:

Abstract:

Hierarchical porous carbon (HPC) monolithic with 3D network has received considerable attention due to their potentially technological application as candidates for electrochemical energy storage devices such as capacitors, lithium ion batteries, solar cells, sorbent for toxic gas separation and greenhouse gas capture for their well-defined pore dimensions and topologies. Synthetic polymer based hierarchical nanostructured carbons are particularly attractive for their consistent pore dimensions which can be adjustable on long length scales, so that diffusibility of guest species could be improved through its unique hierarchical pores. N-doped HPC monoliths exhibit multifaceted features such as tunable textural properties, excellent thermal and chemical stability, which are remarkable physicochemical properties that are answerable for micro/nanostructured porous carbons perfect candidates for emerging substrates in nanotechnology science.A two-step synthetic method has been developed to achieve functionalized nanoporous carbons via cross-linked polymer precursors, which are prepared by Friedel-craft alkylation and pyrolysis as showen in fig. 1. Nitrogen-doping proves to be an effective method for reinforcing the CO2 adsorption capacity of carbon-based adsorbents, although it remains a great challenge to reach a fit doping level of nitrogen (N) and a high porosity in a porous carbon simultaneously. Herein, a facile method that enables the fabrication of ordered microporous nitrogen-doped porous carbon .monolith with a content of 4.6 wt% N, which employs poly (H-BINAM) as precursor. Through chemical activation, high microporosity is generated and gives birth to a monolithic structured porous nitrogen-doped carbon. This material exhibits a remarkable CO2 adsorption capacity (6.74 mmol g-1 at 273 K and 4.27 mmol g-1 at 298 K under 1 bar), and an extraordinarily excellent CO2/N2 selectivity (153), which is calculated from the single-component adsorption isotherms based on Henry’s Law. This value exceeds the CO2/N2 selectivity of thus mentioned for carbon-based adsorbents including diverse nitrogen doped ones, whose attributes are largely associated with the unusually high N-content as well as the partial graphitic framework.

Biography:

Abstract:

n recent years, the study of modified-TiO2based electrodes has gained great attention to help improve its photo-electrochemical performance. Modifications with metals [1,2], non-metals [3,4], transition metals [5,6] and rare-earth metals [7,8]have been studied; however, research in alkali-modified TiO2is limited when compared to the aforementioned strategies. Owing to their low first ionization potentials, alkali metals supposed toreduce the total work function of TiO2, which can be an effective way to improve the performance of titania-based catalysts[9]. Herein, we investigatethedesign and characterization ofefficient sodium-modified TiO2photo-electrodes readily prepared by the electrochemical anodization of titanium metal followed by soaking treatment in aqueous solution containing quantitative NaOH alkaline medium.The crystalline properties revealed no change in the main peak positions and shapes of pristine TiO2which signifies that the existence of sodium did not affect the crystalline structure of TiO2; the modification was only confined to the surface of the nanotubes. Our analysis of the photo-electric properties showed that thesurface modified photo-catalysts exhibited an almost threefold increase in their photocurrent response (0.66 mA cm-2) relevant to the unmodified TiO2(0.22 mAcm-2) under 1 sun intensity; these feature were ascribed to the former’s remarkable charge separation and mobility. 
 
to the former’s remarkable charge separation and mobility. 

Andrey Norov

JSC “The Research Institute for Fertilizers and Insecto-Fungicides, Russia

Title: Green technologies developed by JSC “NIUIF”
Biography:

Andrey Norov has graduated from D. Mendeleev’s University of Chemical Technology in Russia, for over 25 years, he had been working at Mineral Fertilizers Plants. Since April 2007, he has been working for JSC “NIUIF”, at the present moment his job title is an Industrial Technology Director. He has obtained his PhD in Engineering Science. He is an Honorable Chemist of the Russian Federation, and also he got governmental and industry-related awards. He is an author of 73 research articles and publications, and 27 patents in the field of phosphorus-containing fertilizers technology. He took part as a Speaker in 21 international conferences and symposiums.

Abstract:

 

IntherecentyearsJSC “The Research Institute for Fertilizers and Insecto-Fungicides Named after Professor Y. Samoilov” (JSC “NIUIF”), the oldest (established in September 1919)industry-orientedinstituteinRussiahas developed a range of sustainable, environment-friendly, zero-wastetechnologies, that ensure minimal consumption of materials and energy resources and fully consistent with the principles of Green Chemistry that include:Environmentally friendly energy and resource saving technology of sulfuric acid from sulfur according to DC-DA scheme (double conversion - double absorption) [1]Improved zero-waste technology of wet phosphoric acid (WPA) by dihydrate-hemihydrate processapplicable to various types of phosphate raw materials [2,3]Flexible, efficient, zero-waste, universal technology of NP / NPS / NPK / NPKS fertilizers with maximum utilization of heat from chemical processes [4]An innovative, zero-waste, no-analogue technology of granular PK / PKS  NPKS fertilizers with controlled dissolution rate and nutrient supply into the soil solution, which allows to process a number of wastes and by-products;An innovative resource-saving joint processing of wastes from production of phosphogypsum and fluorosilicic acid (FSA) into ammonium sulfate with simultaneous neutralization of fluoride compounds without using lime.All listed green technologies are protected by Russian and Eurasian patents.The development of environment-friendly, safe, green technologies is ongoing in JSC “NIUIF”.

 

 


Speaker
Biography:

I did my M.Sc and M.Phil in Organic Chemistry from Dr. B.R. Ambedkar University, Agra, India and pursuing PhD in Chemistry from Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Dayalbagh Educational Institute, Dayalbagh, Agra India. I am engaged in the research under the domains of Natural product, Green Chemistry and Green nanotechnology. I am a recipient of UGC-BSR fellowship in Science for Meritorious Students and published his research papers in the International journal of repute

Abstract:

In spite of significant progress dealing with cancer, it has remained as one of the main cause of death, in the worldwide. Due to the high rate of drug resistance and low bioavailability, recently, green nanotechnology, a new therapeutic approach emerged that focuses on the modern and traditional medicine to overcome this serious problem. This study was designed to resolve this problem, it has offered water-soluble and biocompatible nanoparticles loaded with flavonoids, which can improve the drug delivery and enhanced the bioefficacy.

For this purpose, A family of flavonoids was ascertained as a bioactive principle in the aqueous-alcoholic the bark extract of the indigenous folk plant Madhuca longifolia (Sapotaceae family) using HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS. The flavonoids loaded gold nanoparticles ([email protected]) fabricated in a single green step; exploiting synergistic redox potential of extracted flavonoids and examined by UV-Vis spectroscopy, FE-SEM, TEM, XRD, EDX, and DLS techniques. In-vitro anti-melanoma bio-efficacy carried out against mice (B16F10) and human (A375) melanoma cell lines using MTT and SRB bioassays. The statistically significant anti-melanoma bioefficacy has been explored (65.31%) in the bark extract. Noticeably, the native bark extract and [email protected] may not show any significant toxicity towards the normal human lymphocyte cells highlighting their safe and non-toxic nature. Native bark extract exhibited anti-melanoma bioefficacy (65.31% and 66.74%) at the dose (50µg/ml) in B16F10 and A375 melanoma cell lines respectively. [email protected] exhibited anti-melanoma bioefficacy (85.15% and 86.34%) at the dose (15µg/ml) against both the cell lines respectively. Statistically significant (p<0.05) enhancement in anti-melanoma bioefficacy with reduction of doses in anti-melanoma bioefficacy (16.36-19.84 %) has been successfully attempted through [email protected] The mechanistic pathway of observed anti-melanoma efficacy of [email protected] has been discussed based on our experimental findings on percent inhibition of melanoma cells, production of intracellular reactive oxygen species, production of nitric oxide, and increase caspase-3 activities.

Speaker
Biography:

Professor Zazi khalida received the degree of engineer in electromechanical in 1988 from Rabat Higher School of Mines (ESMR) , and preparatory certificate of research    in 1997 from School Mohammedia of Engineering and a doctoral thesis in photovoltaic’s in 2017 from Faculty of Science and Technology Mohanmmadia, University Hassan II Casablanca. Having worked as a researcher at the National Center for Scientific and Technical Research of Rabat (CNRST) . Currently she is a teacher at the higher normal school of Technical Education of Rabat (ENSET) University Mohammed V Rabat since 2014.

 

Abstract:

Photovoltaic energy has experienced great development. Research around the world covers this wide-ranging field, and tries to improve the performance of photovoltaic systems through manufacturing processes and the exploitation of new photovoltaic cell concepts and development of novel MPTT control strategies to ensure a good transfer of energy and eliminate the harmonics distortion of current and voltage in a photovoltaic system connected to grid a new ADRC technical control is implemented  to achieve maximum  power point (MPP).The performances of grid  connected photovoltaic power system using DC-AC power inverters is studied using an active disturbance rejection control ADRC strategy developed to extract the maximum power of the solar energy, to maintain constant the DC-bus voltage, and to inject a suitable current into the grid with power factor near unity. It is susceptible to power grid disturbance, sudden environment changes and parameters uncertainties. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Adedokun has his PhD at the Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. He was also a research scholar at the Wilson College of Textiles, at the North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina, USA. He is currently a lecturer/researcher at the Federal Polytechnic, Kaura-Namoda, Nigeria. He has published a number of journals and attended relevant conferences worldwide. His current research work is on ‘A new and sustainable approach at combating environmental pollution from textile/leather effluents in Nigeria’s growing Industries’.

 

Abstract:

The various processes used in the textile processing industry contribute its major portion to the environmental pollution. The discharge of highly coloured waste is not only aesthetically displeasing, but it also interferes with the transmission of light and upsets the biological processes which may then cause the direct destruction of aquatic life present in the receiving stream. A small amount of dye in water (10-50mg/L) is highly visible and reduces light penetration in water systems, thus causing a negative effect on photosynthesis. Escalating costs of effluent treatments due to increasingly stringent governmental regulations pose a major economic problem for the textile industry. The most effective means to curb these costs is waste minimization at the source by optimizing application processes. This itself is achieved by using some carefully chosen heterocyclic disperse dyes which were synthesized in our laboratory. Some novel 2-aminothiophenes were prepared from cyan acetates and a range of 1,3- dicarbonyl compounds such as, o-acetoacetotoluidide, 4-chloroacetoacetanilide, and o-acetoacetanisidide using the Karl-Gewald one-pot technique. 

Speaker
Biography:

Fabrizio Olivito is Postdoctoral researcher at the University of Calabria, Italy, under the supervision of Prof. Antonio De Nino. He obtained the Master’s degree in chemistry at the University of Calabria in 2015 and, after that, he completed his PhD studies in 2019 at the University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Italy, under the supervision of Prof. Antonio Procopio. He spent the second year of his PhD at the University of California, Davis, under the supervision of Prof. Mark Mascal.

 

Abstract:

Lignocellulosic materials are widespread in nature and cellulose represents the main component.1 Due to the high stability of this natural polymer, the depolymerisation and/or conversion into useful materials, under mild conditions, is still a challenge today.2,3 Our research group recently developed a new approach for the contemporary cellulose depolymerisation and fictionalization into bio-oil and cellulose-citrate, under short times, solvent free conditions and atmospheric pressure.4Cellulose is mixed with citric acid at the melting point of the acid. After the reaction time, bio-oil is extracted with a common organic solvent, while esterifies cellulose is collected as a solid. The open air system and the three acidic functionalities of citric acid lead cellulose depolymerisation.  The obtained oil is composed mainly of furan compounds, recovered in excellent yields. Chemical characterization of this bio-oil was carried out. Cellulose hydrolysis is accompanied by an etherification reaction and the product in the form of cellulose-citrate was also collected in high yields and characterized. 

Speaker
Biography:

Dr. Anupama Diwan is presently working as a Professor and Dean at the School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Apeejay Stya University. She has research and teaching experience of over 24 years. She has supervised over 50 students and 10 PhD scholars for their research dissertations. Dr Diwan has authored six books and published over 100 research, review and posters in various national and international journals. Her primary areas of research include Novel Drug Delivery Systems, Pharmacokinetics, Nanotechnology, Industrial Pharmacy, Quality Assurance, Bioavailability Enhancement and Modified Tran dermal Formulations.

Abstract:

The COVID-19 pandemic crisis has bestowed prima challenge for the  collection services, handling and disposal of infectious waste. There is also a large increase in the amount of single use plastics including masks, gloves, gowns and other protective equipment being produced by hospitals and individuals than usual. If not soundly management, this infected waste may lead to huge dumping, giving rise to public health risks. Therefore, individual require counselling on safely disposal of the used medical equipment also there is need of more robust systems for waste segregation, collection and management. All the medical and infectious waste should be treated non- recyclable to prevent human contact with infectious agents. The waste should  be disposed in colour waste should be color coded bins/ plastic bags or other colour coded containers with “swan neck” tied with proper labeling and date.  As per NACO guidelines infectious needle should be pretreated with 1% Sodium hypochlorite solution for at least 30 minutes for controlling the spread of HIV. Similarly, the COVID infected waste should be pretreated with virucide such as Formaldehyde, hydrogen peroxide, Potassium permanganate, Sodium hypochlorite solution etc for a specified time and sealed properly to prevent chances of infection. As the COVID-19 virus is composed of structural and non structural proteins and RNA, pre treatment with formaldehyde causes intermolecular cross-linking and disruption of cytoplasmic enzymes by reacting with amino groups of proteins. Similarly, KMnO4 reduces the bacterial and viral bioload by its oxidizing potential and Hydrogen peroxide provide virucidal effect by causing the breakage in RNA strands and ribosomes. Therefore, to prevent human infection all municipal waste should be pretreated with sanitizers and then disposed of through incineration or sanitary landfill.

Biography:

Hello Madam, It is with a real motivation that I address you my participation as much as I am very interested by your organization in the field industry. I am a phd researcher in chemistry, a chemistry degree and Continuing training in industrial production and project management option surface treatment in Automotive and Aeronautics industry. in Being Motivated and available immediately.

 

Abstract:

The rejections of many industries (plastic, cosmetic, paper, and especially textile) are heavily loaded with dyes that have a toxicological impact dangerous on the environment. Methylen bleu (BM)  is an cationic dye widely used in the laboratory and in the textile industry. Carcinogenic and mutagenic, it is a powerful pollutant of water. And also Safranine is one of the most used synthetic  cationic dyes. It is a reddish brown powder soluble in water, which is mainly used as a food coloring in flavoring candies and biscuits. Safranine is also used to dye tannin, cotton, bast fibers, wool, silk, leather and paper.The purpose of this work is the liquid-solid extraction of cationic or anionic dyes from dilute aqueous solutions of 10 mg / l of both dyes with a zeolite material. The effect of several parameters on the adsorption performances were studied (contact time, the mass of the support, pH ...).

The results obtained are as follows:

  •  The equilibrium of the adsorption was obtained after 180 min of two cationic dyes (SF and BM) with a low mass of zeolite (0.1g) and at pH = 6.5.
  • The adsorption capacity of the dye by the zeolite increases slightly with the increase of the temperature from 25 ° to 55 ° C.
  • The evolution of the adsorption capacity over time at different dye concentrations ranging from 10 to 200 mg / l with a maximum capacity of adsorption of the dye by the zeolite to.
  • Qmax ( SF) =7,15mg/g.
  • Qmax (BM) =7,36mg/g.

The study of the kinetic models confirms, on the one hand, that the adsorption of the two dyes (SF) and (BM) on the zeolite follows the pseudo-first order model, and on the other hand, that the Langmuir isotherm is the appropriate model to explain the safranine adsorption process on the zeolite.

 

Biography:

Mr. Muhammad Usman, Former Director General of Agricultural Research System, Government of Pakistan who retired from service after a spotless career of about 32 years with senior level experience on research and development of integrated agricultural production, industries, Agriculture & Horticulture and bioenergy on a sustainable way.

 

Mr. Usman is consider as the senior most scientist in the world, always participated in the international conferences as a plenary speaker, keynote speaker, renowned speaker, organizing committee member as well as moderator of the conferences around the world. Mr. Usman established “Prominent Agro Based Industries, Agro Based Industries and Consultancy SDN BHD” in Malaysia and “Foundation for Rural Development in Pakistan”, with primarily aims to work on integrated agricultural project for Rural Development through improvement in agriculture and consultancy services to the formers at Malaysia.

 

Abstract:

The aim of presentation consist of green chemistry, health, life, crises, global poverty and hunger were studied and reported that Green Chemistry and Technology is the major industry for the development of health, basic need of daily life, create employment, generate income, stronger economy, reducing financial crises, global Poverty and hunger in the developing countries of the world particularly in south Asia. The study reported that chemistry is the science of composition, structure, properties and reaction of a substance, matter and molecular system. Green chemistry is one of the branch of chemistry, major sustainable industry consists of design of chemical products and processes that reduce or eliminate the use or generation of hazardous substance. Green chemistry applies across the life cycle of a chemical product including its design, manufacture, use and ultimate disposal. It is also called as a sustainable chemistry, is an area of chemistry and chemical engineering focused on the designing of products and process that minimize the use and generation of hazardous substances. The major principal of green chemistry including prevention, atom economy, less hazardous chemical synthesis, designing safer chemicals, safer solvents and auxiharies, design for energy efficiency, use of renewable feed stocks etc. the study further reported that green chemistry prevent pollution, reduce the negative impact of chemical products, eliminate the amount of toxic substance and minimize the hazards of chemical feed stock.The study reported that the total countries available in the world are 225, consist of (Developed countries = 49, developing countries = 150, observer state = 4, state without partial recognition = 8, unrecognized state = 14). Similarly, South Asia comprises the countries of Pakistan, Bangladesh, India, Bhutan, Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka.  In the light of above study, it is proposed that Nutritional Science and Food Chemistry should be commercialized  for the development of health, basic need of daily life, create employment, generate income, stronger economy, reducing financial crises, global Poverty and hunger in the developing countries of the world particularly in south Asia.

 

Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Biography:

Tofik Nagiev is a Vice-president of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Director of Research Center of “Azerbaijan National Encyclopedia” and Department chief of Nagiev Institute of Catalysis and inorganic chemistry of ANAS. The Professor  of the department of the physical and colloid chemistry of Baku State University. He is author of the monography “Coherent Synchronized Oxidation Reactions by Hydrogen Peroxide”, Amsterdam: “Elsevier”, p. 325, 2007.

 

Abstract:

Kineticsin the model system of reaction of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde peroxidase by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of an iron porphyrin-containing biomimetic catalyst were studied. Application of such oxidation system, as shown by experimental results, meets the basic requirements of the Green Chemistry concept. The process was carried out in the gas phase at the temperature of 180°C and atmospheric pressure on per-FTPhPFe3+OH/Al2O3heterogeneous biomimetic catalyst using 20% hydrogen peroxide. As a result of the process acetaldehyde was obtained with the yield of 93.5% and selectivity of 98%(taking into account the loss).Through the experimental study of kinetic laws of ethyl alcohol peroxidase reaction, coherently synchronized nature of the mechanism of ethyl alcohol conversion to acetaldehyde by hydrogen peroxide on the surface of the biomimetic was identified. Thereby there was a need for a special approach to the kinetic modeling of this reaction. The mechanism presented demonstrates that the following two interconnected and interacting reactions proceed in this system: the reaction ofН2О2decomposition of and the reaction of peroxidase oxidation of ethyl alcohol, according to [1-3].

 

Chair

Saurabh Yadav

Faculty of Science